7 Tips to Make Your Eyeshadow Pop

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Have you ever seen someone’s makeup online and thought “that is BEAUTIFUL!!!! I have to have that!!!” You go out and spend hundreds of dollars on different eyeshadow palettes because you want to express yourself!

There is absolutely nothing wrong with being bold and fearless! As such, sometimes, we want our makeup to reflect that! Nothing is worse than having our hopes up for being bold and standing out than getting that new eyeshadow palette and realizing it was a flop!

Now you’re wondering “how do they get it to look like that”, “are they using different products”, “are they using filters”, forget it, it’s fake — let’s just throw the whole thing away.

Wait! Before you throw it away and vow to never try eyeshadow again, let’s see what we can do to fix it.

There are a number of reasons why eyeshadow colors aren’t as vibrant as we’d like. Common reasons: poor pigmentation or product development, technique, skin complexion and skin type.

One way to get the eyeshadow to pop, or even show up for that matter, is to neutralize the eyelid. Here are a few techniques that I use and would love for you to try to make your eyeshadow pop*!

* Note: in the picture below, it is about 8 p.m. so it’s dark outside, I’m sitting in the car and my eyeshadow is still showing using one of the techniques below!

7 Tips to Make Eyeshadow Pop

Think of art. Most artists begin with a blank canvas. Our eyelids are existing pieces of art. Sometimes they carry oil which causes eyeshadow to fade or crease and other times, our veins or other discolorations show through. Before you apply ANY eyeshadow, be sure to try one of the techniques below.

Remember, most masterpieces with a blank canvas πŸ™‚

1. Use a base

Neutralize the eyelid with a white or black base. White or black are most commonly sold so easier to find but are also opposite of your skin complexion so will really stand out. I’m a half cut-crease type of girl so my personal favorite is NYX Jumbo Eye Pencil in Milk (white) or Black Bean (black). It is a pencil that can be used as an eyeliner or eyeshadow, according to the company. In this case, we’ll use it as a base πŸ™‚ It gives the eye a very dramatic uplift.

Once your eyes are prepped, primed and brows drawn, apply the pencil from the base of the eyelid (near eyelashes) to your crease. Then softly blend out from the crease to an upward motion (towards your eyebrows). This will help diffuse the stark base and give you a little more dimension or help with getting a great half- or full cut-crease.

Eyeshadow that POPS in the night
In the car

2. Use concealer

When most people think of concealer, they think of hiding flaws or highlighting; however, you can also use concealer to neutralize the eyelid. Some people use foundation to serve as a base but concealer has a thicker consistency, offers more coverage and easier to control.

Apply concealer, blend it out and add a thin coat of translucent powder to set it and help absorb oil (if you have only skin).

3. Use eyeshadow primer

Like concealer, eyeshadow primer is usually thicker in consistency so product sticks to it pretty easily. Not only does primer help the eyeshadow stay on but it also absorbs oil and helps to prevent creasing — great if you have oily eyelids!

TECHNIQUE – After the eyelids are prepped and primed using one of the methods above.

4. Rose Water

If you’ve never heard of Rose Water, you are in for a real treat! You can either buy it locally or make your own. It is wonderful for hydration and can even be used to prep or moisturize the skin before applying makeup. Rose water has more benefits than water when it comes to the skin.

If you make the rose water, put in a bottle so you can spritz your eyeshadow brush. The brush does NOT need to be dripping wet. You want it to feel slightly damp. Dip the brush in the eyeshadow. The moisture should help the brush pick up more pigment.

5. Setting Spray

Just like Rose Water, Setting Spray can be used. Setting spray has properties that help makeup lasts all day but also has ingredients that have more like an “adhesive” property so the pigments stick and stay put. Lightly spritz the brush with setting spray, dip in the eyeshadow or pigment and apply to the lid.

6. Right type of brush

There are many types of makeup brushes. Each brush is not created equal. Instead of using a fluffy blending brush which disperses the color, try a flat shader brush to really collect the eyeshadow and pack it onto the lid.

7. Application

Application makes the world of a difference! Many beginners apply eyeshadow in a windshield wiper motion — sweeping it across the eye lid from left to right. This is great for blending; however, the technique lessens the intensity of the eyeshadow pigment. Instead, use the flat shader brush and pat or press the eyeshadow on to the desired spot.

What’s my favorite type of method? My personal fave is concealer! The first thing I do when applying makeup is fill in my eyebrows. Once my brows are filled in, I clean them up and make them look sharper with concealer. I take the concealer down from the brow to the base of my lid, blend it out and apply a little translucent powder.

Depending on my desired look, I may combine a few of the techniques such as concealer with a white base or if an eyeshadow is really spotty, I’ll also spritz my brush and continue to build up the color! I usually do this for a more dramatic, half-cut crease.

Interested in the concealer I use? Check out the True Color Ideal Nude Cream Concealer in Deep.

What’s your favorite method for making your eyeshadow POP?